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Latest scam text message appears to come from bank

The first rule for all scammers: If you’re trying to get people’s personal information, don’t send your scam text to a cybersecurity expert.

That’s exactly how this latest scam was uncovered.

The text appears to be from your bank and reads your account has been limited, but like most such texts, it’s not real at all.

Albert Whale, the founder of IT Security Solutions in Pittsburgh, got the message this weekend and said he was tipped off by several things.

First, it claimed to be from PNC Bank. He doesn’t even have an account with PNC.

Second, there was a phone number attached that wasn’t linked to any bank, so he decided to call it.

The first thing he heard on the other end: Please key in your nine-digital Social Security number, your PIN, and either your credit card or debit card number.

“Right out of the chute, Social Security… oh, that’s going to work,” Whale said.

“My reaction immediately was, ‘Oh my God, I can’t believe they’re trying to do this.'”

Whale said this is more than just troubling. He said if you enter that information, your whole bank account could disappear.

Bottom line from PNC: do not click on a link or use contact information contained in a suspect email or text message.

Instead, if you have questions or concerns about your account, contact the bank directly using a known number from a legitimate source or go to the PNC website.

RESOURCE
FTC: How to recognize and report spam text messages

Author: KDKA
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