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Updated grandparents scam involves Uber drivers

There’s a new warning out about scam artists having uber drivers and other rideshare drivers collect thousands of dollars from scam victims.

There’s a new twist to the grandparents’ scam and crooks are grabbing cash right away.

The Sheriff of Volusia County says a scammer there sent an Uber driver to pick up an envelope filled with money.

The Uber driver isn’t a part of the scheme. But, they’re hired to pick up cash from the person being ripped off and deliver it to the crook.

Typically, a grandparent will get a call from someone saying they are their grandkid and they have been arrested or maybe their car broke down.

These scam artists have accurate identifying information they took off the internet and are good at making people feel nervous or that you have to act right away.

The scammers plead for you not to tell the kid’s mom or dad and they will ask for money to be wired or for gift cards to be sent.

Mark Flores is a retired FBI Special Agent and says there are a few steps you can follow if you do get a call.

“You can start by trying to verify if this is in fact a loved one by asking questions only they would know, you can say, let me call you right back,” said Flores. “Call that loved one’s personal phone number and verify with them if they are sick.”

There are a few additional steps you can follow:

  • Check social media privacy settings on accounts
  • Contact another family member to confirm if they are in danger
  • If a scammer says they are the police, call that department
  • Look up the phone number they’re calling from
  • Have a code word with your family for when there’s an emergency

With these scams, crooks often circle back and say that they are an attorney for the grandchild and they try to get even more money.

Reporter:Rich Kolko
Writer:Drew Hill
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