Amazon phishing scams return ahead of Prime Day; here’s what to look out for

Amazon is booming and setting sales records. They have even pledged to hire 100,000 more people to keep up with the growing demand. But more customers means more potential targets for scammers.

One of those scams going around right now starts with a phone call. The call comes from someone claiming to be from Amazon, and the caller ID may even show the company’s customer support number. The scammer says they need to verify our Amazon order.

Identity theft expert Carrie Kerskie says “The so-called rep will go on to say maybe there is a problem with your account.”

Don’t fall for it – it’s a scam. It’s all a scheme to get control of your computer.

Kerskie explains, “When you get this call, you’re caught off guard and you are afraid your account has been hacked.”

If you click on a link they send you, that lets the scammer load remote access software onto your computer.

“Now the bad guy is in your computer,” Kerskie adds. “They can have access to everything in it.”

Keep this in mind: Amazon does not call to verify your order.

You can do that through your amazon account.

Kerskie told us she had one client recognize the scam and shut the computer down, but did so too late. The scammer demanded $3,000 in ransom.

How to protect yourself:

  1. If you see amazon in your caller ID don’t answer the phone. Let the caller leave a message. Chances are he or she won’t.
  2. If you do answer and the caller says he wants to verify your Amazon order. Hang up.
  3. Do not click on any unsolicited links.
  4. If someone gets control of your computer, disconnect the device from the internet and call a professional for help.

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Reporter:Rich Kolko
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