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The group of five fisherman said they were inspired by 104-year-old Setsuo Todoroki, a local fisherman who always shared his catch with people in need. RED SEA OCEAN ADVENTURES VIA CBS AFFILIATE KGMB-TV

Fishermen catch 220-pound tuna and donate it to frontline health care workers in Hawaii

A group of fisherman who caught a 220-pound ahi tuna off the coast of Hawaii did not let their massive catch of the day go to waste. The group of five reeled in far more than their families could eat. So, they donated the fish to front-line workers at at Straub and The Queen’s Medical Centers.

The fishing group included the owner of a seafood business and the executive producer of a popular TV show in the state, CBS affiliate KGMB-TV reports. They caught the tuna in the waters off of Oahu, and instead of making poke bowls, they were inspired by 104-year-old Setsuo Todoroki, a local fisherman who always shared his catch with people in need.

Todoroki was featured on Hawaii Skin Diver TV and after his recent death, executive producer Kyle Nakamoto and his fishing buddies wanted to keep his legacy alive.

“It was nice to be a part of something greater than yourself, especially at a time when everybody needs to come together,” said Tommy Mukaigawa of Monarch Seafoods.

The health care workers that received the gift were overcome by the group’s generosity. “Anytime you can get fresh fish prepared for you and given to you, my God what else can we ask for,” Chimaigne Ralston, a registered nurse at Straub told KGMB-TV.

“When the community does show appreciation for what sometimes feels like a thankless job, it does make an impact,” Cass Nakasone, a doctor at Straub, said.

“We know our restaurants, Monarch Seafood, commercial fishermen, they’ve all been hit by this,” said Christy Passion, and registered nurse and Queen’s Medical Center. “So for them to take time out of their day, their troubles, it’s so humbling and we’re so grateful.”

Author: CAITLIN O'KANE/ CBS News
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