Security Alert: Ways to prevent credit card fraud

Florida was No. 2 in all types of fraud complaints and third in total losses in 2017, so WINK News looked at how to make sure you know about fraud during the minute it happens.

For example, if you get a text that said “Your credit card has just been used to buy three new large televisions and five video game consoles, 1000 miles from home.”

That sounds great; except, you didn’t buy them. Now, you are now the victim of card-not-present fraud (CNP fraud).

Online access to your own accounts can help protect you.

PDF: IC3 Report

By signing up for alerts, your bank or credit card can let you know fast if something unusual happened to your account, usually by email or text.

Carrie Kerskie, an identity theft expert, explains another reason to sign up.

“If you are not setting up online access to you accounts, you’re leaving it open for the bad guy to do it on your behalf,” Kerskie said. “Once they set it up, now they take over and manage everything in your account, including they can transfer funds in and out, change passwords and even block you from gaining access to your own account.”

Setting up your online accounts is one way to lessen your chances of being a victim, but here are a few more.

  • Use a card with a chip
  • Only give card info if you initiated the call
  • Report lost or stolen cards immediately
  • Review your bill carefully
  • Shred documents with your card info
  • Check your online statement frequently to make sure there are no unusual charges

Visit Internet Crime Complaint Center to see how you can become more aware of the different types of fraud that exists.

Author: Rich Kolko/WINK News
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