Published: Sep 08, 2011 7:30 PM EDT

ROCKVILLE, Md. (AP) - Federal officials say a 5.8-magnitude earthquake in the eastern U.S. caused the ground to shake more than a Virginia nuclear plant was designed to withstand.
    
The Nuclear Regulatory Commission says preliminary data from the U.S. Geological Survey shows the Aug. 23 earthquake caused peak ground movement of about 0.26 g, which is a unit of gravity that measures the impact of shaking on buildings. The North Anna nuclear plant was designed to withstand ground movement ranging from 0.12 g to 0.18 g.
    
NRC spokesman Scott Burnell said the plant northwest of Richmond didn't appear to suffer serious damage. It's located about 11 miles from the quake's epicenter. It's been shut since the earthquake and has minor damage.
    
The NRC and plant operator Dominion Resources were discussing the quake Thursday.

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