Published: Jul 14, 2011 4:24 PM EDT
Updated: Jul 14, 2011 3:24 PM EDT

 

The so-called "Great Recession" taught many Americans tough lessons on cutting back financially, but what would be the last thing you'd give up?  
Cash-strapped Americans looking to save money are willing to give up just about anything, but a growing number say "no way" when it comes to giving up their cell phones.
The National Foundation for Credit Counseling asked 3,000 people, "What's the last thing you'd give up in order to save money?"
More than half said they'd hold onto their cell phones as long as possible.
A third put home internet access at the bottom of the list of services they'd be willing to relinquish.
Then there's a long list of perks that rate much lower on the "must have" scale, such as cable TV, shopping online, eating out or a morning latte.
Researchers say the need to stay connected has been a growing trend over the past few years. Plus, many people can still save money without axing their phones all together by cutting back on services or data plans. 
A new study from the Pew Research Center finds that one third of adults in the U.S. own a smartphone.
A quarter of smartphone users do most of their web browsing on their mobile devices. 
So, it looks like Americans have entered the digital age and don't mind the cost of staying connected, even if it means skipping dinner with friends, watching TV with a few less channels on the mix, or cutting back on discretionary purchases. 

The so-called "Great Recession" taught many Americans tough lessons on cutting back financially, but what would be the last thing you'd give up?

Cash-strapped Americans looking to save money are willing to give up just about anything, but a growing number say "no way" when it comes to giving up their cell phones.

The National Foundation for Credit Counseling asked 3,000 people, "What's the last thing you'd give up in order to save money?"

More than half said they'd hold onto their cell phones as long as possible.

A third put home internet access at the bottom of the list of services they'd be willing to relinquish.

Then there's a long list of perks that rate much lower on the "must have" scale, such as cable TV, shopping online, eating out or a morning latte.

Researchers say the need to stay connected has been a growing trend over the past few years. Plus, many people can still save money without axing their phones all together by cutting back on services or data plans.

A new study from the Pew Research Center finds that one third of adults in the U.S. own a smartphone.

A quarter of smartphone users do most of their web browsing on their mobile devices.

So, it looks like Americans have entered the digital age and don't mind the cost of staying connected, even if it means skipping dinner with friends, watching TV with a few less channels on the mix, or cutting back on discretionary purchases.