Published: Jul 14, 2011 5:43 PM EDT
Updated: Jul 14, 2011 4:43 PM EDT

WASHINGTON (AP) - With immigration slowing, babies born in the U.S. rather than newly arrived Mexican immigrants are now driving most of the fast growth in the Latino population.

A Pew Hispanic Center study released Thursday highlights a turning point in Hispanics' rapid U.S. growth. Demographers point to the potential for broader political impact as U.S.-born Mexican-Americans widen their numbers over non-citizen foreign-born counterparts, who have no voting rights.

The Mexican-American population grew by 11.4 million over the last decade, of which 63 percent came as a result of births. That is a reversal from the previous two decades.

In all, the number of new immigrants from Mexico declined over the last decade to 4.2 million, from 4.7 million in 1990-2000.

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