Published: May 03, 2011 4:44 PM EDT
Updated: May 03, 2011 1:46 PM EDT

 

WYATT, Mo. (AP) - Federal officials are promising relief for people affected by the intentional breach of a levee along the Mississippi River in Missouri.
The levee was blown open late yesterday by the Army Corps of Engineers, in hopes of saving a small upstream Illinois town that was threatened by flooding.
But the move sent water surging through 130,000 acres of farmland and about 100 homes in Missouri.
In the aftermath of the breach, the river levels are falling dramatically in Cairo (KAY'-roh), Ill. -- where the Ohio and Mississippi rivers meet.
But floodwaters have been rising downriver -- including in Memhis, Tenn. And the breach in the levee isn't expected to ease those concerns.
Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack and Federal Emergency Management Agency Administrator Craig Fugate (FYOO'-gayt) are promising to coordinate with federal agencies on relief efforts.

WYATT, Mo. (AP) - Federal officials are promising relief for people affected by the intentional breach of a levee along the Mississippi River in Missouri.

The levee was blown open late yesterday by the Army Corps of Engineers, in hopes of saving a small upstream Illinois town that was threatened by flooding.

But the move sent water surging through 130,000 acres of farmland and about 100 homes in Missouri.

In the aftermath of the breach, the river levels are falling dramatically in Cairo (KAY'-roh), Ill. -- where the Ohio and Mississippi rivers meet.

But floodwaters have been rising downriver -- including in Memhis, Tenn. And the breach in the levee isn't expected to ease those concerns.

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack and Federal Emergency Management Agency Administrator Craig Fugate (FYOO'-gayt) are promising to coordinate with federal agencies on relief efforts.