Published: Mar 22, 2011 3:47 AM EDT
Updated: Mar 22, 2011 12:59 AM EDT

NAPLES, Fla. - More than 1,500 supporters join Change.org and Emantras in calling on Florida’s Collier County School District to switch to virtual dissection.

Last month, a Florida middle school received national media attention after a teacher reportedly bullied and taunted a student for refusing to dissect a frog during science class. 
Thirteen-year-old Sarah Wingo, a student at North Naples Middle School in Collier County, Florida,  was protected under Florida's Choice-In-Dissection law, allowing her to opt of dissection with a parent's permission. But instead of offering dissection alternatives, Wingo’s mother reports that the teacher held a bag of freeze dried frogs above her daughter’s head and dropped the bag on her binder. The Florida State Board of Education is now investigating the incident. 
Following the incident, animal rights group PETA (People for Ethical Treatment of Animals), offered to buy the school a set of virtual dissection kits, which have been created by Emantras.
“The Virtual Frog Dissection App is a great educational tool for those who feel queasy about live dissections or have ethical issues with dissecting,” said Sesh Kumar, CEO of Emantras. “Most schools that are using the Virtual Frog Dissection app have appreciated both the learning and cost advantages it offers over regular dissection methods.”
A petition was created on Change.org, the world’s fastest growing social change platform with more than three million monthly readers, calling on the Collier County School Board to switch to humane dissection alternatives.
“The school district should follow Sarah Wingo’s compassionate lead,” said Stephanie Feldstein, an editor at Change.org. “There is no reason why students need to dissect animals, especially with ethical and effective alternatives out there, like the Virtual Frog Dissection app, that protect animals and the environment and save schools money.”
Millions of frogs are captured from the wild every year for use in classrooms, contributing to declines in amphibian populations. According to Save the Frogs, an amphibian conservation organization, frogs are the most rapidly disappearing group of animals on the planet. Save the Frogs has also extended an offer to North Naples Middle School to help them switch to humane dissection alternatives.
Studies have shown that students learn as well or better from non-animal teaching methods compared to traditional animal methods.

More than 1,500 supporters join Change.org and Emantras in calling on Florida’s Collier County School District to switch to virtual dissection.

Last month, a Florida middle school received national media attention after a teacher reportedly bullied and taunted a student for refusing to dissect a frog during science class. 

Thirteen-year-old Sarah Wingo, a student at North Naples Middle School in Collier County, Florida,  was protected under Florida's Choice-In-Dissection law, allowing her to opt of dissection with a parent's permission. But instead of offering dissection alternatives, Wingo’s mother reports that the teacher held a bag of freeze dried frogs above her daughter’s head and dropped the bag on her binder. The Florida State Board of Education is now investigating the incident. 

Following the incident, animal rights group PETA (People for Ethical Treatment of Animals), offered to buy the school a set of virtual dissection kits, which have been created by Emantras.

“The Virtual Frog Dissection App is a great educational tool for those who feel queasy about live dissections or have ethical issues with dissecting,” said Sesh Kumar, CEO of Emantras. “Most schools that are using the Virtual Frog Dissection app have appreciated both the learning and cost advantages it offers over regular dissection methods.”

A petition was created on Change.org, the world’s fastest growing social change platform with more than three million monthly readers, calling on the Collier County School Board to switch to humane dissection alternatives.

“The school district should follow Sarah Wingo’s compassionate lead,” said Stephanie Feldstein, an editor at Change.org. “There is no reason why students need to dissect animals, especially with ethical and effective alternatives out there, like the Virtual Frog Dissection app, that protect animals and the environment and save schools money.”

Millions of frogs are captured from the wild every year for use in classrooms, contributing to declines in amphibian populations. According to Save the Frogs, an amphibian conservation organization, frogs are the most rapidly disappearing group of animals on the planet. Save the Frogs has also extended an offer to North Naples Middle School to help them switch to humane dissection alternatives.

Studies have shown that students learn as well or better from non-animal teaching methods compared to traditional animal methods.