LEE COUNTY, Fla. - WINK News fixes another case of bad bank communication.  Cape Coral homeowners spent a year trying to avoid a foreclosure.  Finally, they closed on a short sale; but their problems didn't end there.  A few months after the bank got paid for that sale, the bank turned around and is suing the homeowners trying to foreclosure on the house they no longer own.

"It was the worst year of my entire life," Claudia Schunemann tells us about the experience of trying to sell her home.

Finally, after three short sale offers fell through, Bank of America approved an offer for $128,000 in cash.  They closed on the sale in February.  The Schunemann's nightmare was over; or so they thought.

"My husband said to me, a few weeks ago, opening the mail, 'you are not going to be happy about this,' and I took a look at it and I cannot believe that we are being sued by Countrywide," she recalls.

That's right.  Countrywide, now Bank of America, was taking the Schunemanns to court to foreclose on a property no longer in their possession.  

"I said I cannot believe this-- I just cannot believe that this is happening.  I can't believe that anybody could be that stupid.  One end doesn't know what the other end is doing, obviously.  Something is radically wrong," Schunemann tells us.

After contacting the law firm that filed the foreclosure lawsuit, the Schunemanns say they haven't heard one word, back.  They aren't sure what will happen on their court date.

"There's nothing more they can take.  There's nothing more.  They can't take-- they took the house, they can't take anymore.  There's nothing," she says.

We talked to Bank of America, trying to get some answers for the Schunemanns.  While the law firm never called us back, we did get a response from the bank.  

In an email BOA told us, "We apologize to the Schunemanns, for this was a mistake and we are correcting the records to stop the court actions."

We checked the court system and as of this evening, the Schunemann's court date was still in place.